Steps to a Painting: Silent Hill 3

While the overall mood to Silent Hill 2 was that of abandonment, melancholy, and restrained use of blood and rust to provide the player with a sense of dread and unease, Silent Hill 3 accomplishes this by dialing up the blood/rustometer to 1000. Some fans of the Silent Hill series think Silent Hill 3 was a bit of a disappointment compared to the gaming demigod that is Silent Hill 2, but I love both games, for different reasons.

What’s most immediately noticeable about Silent Hill 3 is that it features the first (and so far only) female protagonist in the series- Heather Mason!

I really liked Heather as a character and protagonist- she’s cheeky, sarcastic, and pretty normal. It was nice to play a (comparatively) normal person in a Silent Hill game, after *Spoiler* playing as a dude that smothered his sick wife to death with a pillow in the previous installment. By all appearances, Heather is a normal teenaged girl, seemingly swept up in a series of random, nightmarish events. I won’t get into too much detail about the story, but basically, Heather is beckoned to the eerie town of Silent Hill by the frightening religious cult that resides there, and who are intent on her serving as a “holy vessel” to birth their nightmarish ‘God.’

I found this scenario to be profoundly disturbing, and also refreshing because it’s a uniquely feminine fear- to have something evil, unwanted, growing inside your body that you have no control over- that is surviving off of you. The way that the game repeats this theme throughout , through environments, motifs, and of course, the monsters, is also fascinating and is what people love about the Silent Hill series.

For instance, some environments of the game are seemingly designed to be womb-like. The walls in the “nightmare” environments (every environment in the game has a parallel nightmare version of it) often pulsate and writhe.

image via Gaming Update

Hospitals are a major motif:

And, of course, the more literal. Try to imagine that as anything other than a gaping vagina. You even have to jump down into it to fight the final boss.

Wallpaper courtesy of Parrafahell

Around the time that I played Silent Hill 3 for the first time, I painted this:

-Megan Koth- Sinister Womb- 2008?

I took the main theme of the game that I found so frightening- the idea of a womb festering something evil and destructive. I used acrylic- mostly fluid acrylic, to complete this painting. Playing Silent Hill just makes me want to play with red, rusty colors- so I used those in abundance. I tried to make the painting look womb-like, and the cobalt “crosses” in the painting are reflective of the religious themes of the game. I only realized this later on, as I didn’t include them intentionally at the time I painted this. I did start the painting with Silent Hill in mind, though. I also included some found objects, including some (fake) fingernails in the upper left. For a long time, this was seriously my favorite painting of mine. Looking at it now, I still like it, but more in a nostalgic way. Then again, that’s pretty much the best way any artist can feel about a painting they did in high school.

Exploring the world of Silent Hill is a real (creepy) delight. I highly recommend checking out the series if you can find a used copy of Silent Hill 3 (or 2). It’s critically acclaimed for a reason, people! They’re especially delightful if you enjoy puzzles. These aren’t “move this statue to find something behind it” puzzles we’re talkin’ about here. They can be really challenging and bizarre. Like, “somehow I have to accomplish something with this wax doll and a strand of hair I found in a box with like 1000 locks on it.” That kind of puzzle.

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