Back to Watercolor

Lately I’ve been back to doing a lot of small, quick abstract watercolor paintings. I think I need this to wind down after months of working on super structured and planned oil paintings in school. It feels good to let loose for a bit with a low cost, low risk medium. If a painting doesn’t work out, I have no problem throwing it away and starting a new one (something much more difficult to do after investing in a canvas painting.)

Untitled 2_Megan Koth (562x800)

 Untitled, Watercolor and crayon on paper, Megan Koth, 07/2014

I’ve been enjoying using mixed media, like pencil, stamps, and crayon, to add texture and visual interest.

Untitled 1_Megan Koth (552x800)

Untitled, Watercolor, graphite, and crayon on paper, Megan Koth, 07/2014

And I even managed to stumble upon some abstract flowers! Totally unlike me, but I like how they turned out nonetheless.

Red Flowers Watercolor2_MeganKoth (800x576)

Red Posies, Megan Koth.  Prints and more of this available at my Redbubble store!

Doing these little watercolors has always been a kind of palette cleanser for me to do between big paintings. I see it as the painting equivalent of doing stretches before a big race.

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Using Crayon with Watercolor

010 (500x215)

Lately I’ve been experimenting with using plain old crayola crayons with watercolor. The crayon sort of gets a bad rap- they’re childish, cheap, and used to be racist. But, I always thought, and continue to think, that a box of crayons is one of the more beautiful things one can own.  Seeing them all lined up in the box, the tips sharpened to that vaguely conical point, certainly feels warmly nostalgic to me (they were also my favorite “how it’s made” segment of Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood.) But, of course, I now find myself working with them in a more “serious” manner:

Crayon Pics 1 and 2

Crayon Painting 4 Megan Koth

All paintings by Megan Koth, 2013.

Using crayons with watercolor like this is a great way to do a quick resist, and/or to add interesting linear effects. The crayon marks “blend in” pretty well with the watercolor- I was afraid it may look too garish. I’m even starting to enjoy doing sketches in my sketchbook with them. There’s something very relaxing about using crayons for me, and I’m sure the same is true for a lot of people. They make me want to work more freely and directly- probably because that’s how we all worked with them as children. As artists, sometimes our biggest challenge is trying to grasp that sense of confidence and spontaneity again. After all, as Picasso famously said, “It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.”